Organisation Description Year
Department for Constitutional Affairs

Legal Disciplinary Practices: A Discussion of the Clementi Proposals. Jordi Blanes I Vidal Ian Jewitt Clare Leaver

Suggest possible positive diversity effects from ABS – Pages 13-14
External ownership bringing greater diversity – Page 32

2005
The Law Society

Partnership

Summary – number of partners broken down by gender ethnicity and age

2005
The Law Society

Key Facts on the solicitors profession

Summary – number of solicitors with practising certificates, in private practice, broken down by gender and ethnicity.

2005
The Law Society

Key Facts on the solicitors profession

Summary – number of solicitors with practising certificates, in private practice, broken down by gender and ethnicity.

2006
The Law Society

Key Facts on the solicitors profession

Summary – number of solicitors with practising certificates, in private practice, broken down by gender and ethnicity.

2007
Legal Services Board

Barriers to the legal market – Rosaline Sullivan

Review of barriers to diversity in legal services

2010
Bar Standards Board

NUMBER OF QCs

Summary numbers of self employed bar by gender and ethnicity

2008
The Law Society

Private Practice Solicitors salaries

Summary of a survey. Earnings by gender and employment sector – Page 1

2008
The Law Society

Private Practice Solicitors salaries

Summary of a survey. Earnings by gender and employment sector – Page 4
Earnings by gender and private practice grade – Page 5

2005
The Law Society

Private Practice Solicitors salaries

Summary of a survey. Earnings by gender and employment sector – Page 4
Earnings by gender and private practice grade – Page 5

2007
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors

Summary of diversity of profession
Page 6 & 7

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 13
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 14
Increase in Praticising certificate holders since 1950 – Page 15
Breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates by gender and number of years qualified – Page 17
Gender breakdown by category of employment – page 18
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 19
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, and status – Pages 21-24

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 70
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 71-83

2000
American Bar Association

Diversity in the legal profession – the next steps

Summary report on diversity within American Legal Profession, and what key issues are

2010
The Law Society

Key Facts on the solicitors profession

Summary – number of solicitors with practising certificates, in private practice, broken down by gender and ethnicity.

2008
The Law Society

Age & Solictors Profession

Summary statistics showing Age of solicitors by gender and ethnicity 1995-2005

2005
The Law Society

Key Facts on the solicitors profession

Summary – number of solicitors with practising certificates, in private practice, broken down by gender and ethnicity.

2009
Cardiff University

Damage based contingency fees in employment cases

Survey indicates that claims consultants (in employment survey) tend to work for smaller practices (page 22) – although this may just be survey sampling.

2008
The Law Society

Minority Ethnic Group solictors

Summary – number of solicitors with practising certificates, trainees, broken down by ethnicity.

2006
Otterburn Legal Consulting

Financial and management training needs in solicitor firmFor the Legal Services Commission

Survey of Legal Aid firms in 2008, undertaken to assess financial capabilities found that:
Survey received 527 responses.

2009
The Law Society

Minority Ethnic Group solictors

Summary – number of solicitors with practising certificates, trainees, broken down by ethnicity.

2005
Legal Services Research Centre

Routine Diversity Monitoring of the Supplier Base

Survey results for 43% of legal aid solicitors firms and NfP organisations.
Ethnicity of Managerial control -solicitors page 7 – NfPs page 9
Gender pages 16-18,
Long term limiting illness or disability, pages 20-21
Age, pages 22-24
Categories of legal work compared pages 30-37

2009
Bar Council

Annual Statistics Self Employed Bar

Total numbers of QCs by gender Self Employed Bar 1986 to 2009

2009
Bar Standards Board

Barristers in the self-employed bar -statistics

Summary numbers of self employed bar by gender and rank

2008
BMG Research / Skills for Justice

Skills in the justice sector: a survey of third sector employers 2009

Two thirds of organisations surveyed had no more than 10 paid staff or volunteers (page 2). Size of organisation explained in greater depth (page 21).

2009
Legal Services Policy Institute

Towards a new regulatory structure for corporate and commercial legal services

Sole practitioners to

2009
The Law Society

Flexible working and Solicitors work life balance

Solicitors working flexibly by partnership size and gender

2005
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Commissioned research into issues of disproportionality

Solicitors working in small firms are more likely to have a case raised against them and are more likely to be BME

2010
London School of Economics

Diversity staff and the dynamics of diversity policymaking in large law firms Joanne P. Braithwaite

Reports on the findings of 17 interviews diversity staff and lawyers from 13 large law firms, diversity staff in clients of those law firms and a Minister from the DCA (now MoJ) in 2007.
History of diversity initiatives in larger law firms and the effectiveness of different approaches – pages 4 – 11
Research suggests law firms are behind other industries in their approach to diversity – page 14
Activities include hiring diversity officers, and promoting themselves to a broader range of potential job applicants.
For larger law firms: “”In relation to the workforce within firms, the principal problem which diversity initiatives were concerned with was the retention of women lawyers. The most common diversity policies in place as regards the firms’ workforce were therefore aimed at addressing the ‘leaking pipeline’ of women.”" Page 18 Steps have included female lawyer networks, mentoring, flexible working etc.
Reports that diversity initiatives are often considered in terms of their financial business case, and “”market orientated empiricism”", as well as association with external awards for diversity – pages 21-22.

2010
The Law Society

Career experiences of gay and lesbian solicitors

Reports on findings of a survey looking at experiences of gay and lesbian solicitors.

2006
Bar Standards Board

Survey on Bar Standards Board Regulation of New Business Structures July 2010

Reports on different attitudes to ABS based on diversity:
46 per cent of non-white barristers find access to new methods of distributing profits as important compared with 29 per cent of their white colleagues;
Improved stability and financial security is a more important issue with female barristers (81 per cent) than their male counterparts (72 per cent);
Barristers with children put a higher emphasis on the ability to work in partnership with non barristers (40 per cent), the ability to provide a more efficient and cheaper service (71 per cent) and the facilitation of joint tendering for work (43 per cent) than their colleagues without children (32, 64 and 38 per cent respectively).
Barristers with a disability have several differences from those without when looking at business practices, such as an increased emphasis on the ability to work with non barristers (54 per cent compared with 36 per cent of those
without a disability) and the ability to raise capital and investment (44 per cent compared with 34 per cent). Again, however, these findings should be treated
with caution due to small base sizes.
Page 18

Interest varies within groups of barrister. Non-white barristers are significantly more likely (45 per cent) to join one of these structures in the next five years than their white counterparts (35 per cent). In addition to this, almost two fifths of men (39 per cent) are very or fairly likely to join the new structures compared with just over a quarter of women (28 per cent). – Page 20 See also Table 1

Demographic differences among barristers in terms of attitudes towards ABS – pages 69-70

2010
The Law Society

Ethnicity and earnings in private practice

Reports on 18% pay gap between White & BME solicitors – page 3 & pages 7-8
Practice differences between BME & White solicitors – pages 8 -9
Reasons for the differences page 9 – 12
Changes since 2007 page 12
No evidence of direct discrimination – page 14

2009
Legal Services Research Centre

Transforming legal aid: Access to criminal defence services Dr Vicky Kemp

Reporting on history of BME providers:
McConville et al. (1994) documented the early involvement of BME solicitors, particularly in the inner-city areas. At that time, the legal world was dominated by White middle-class lawyers, but inner-city firms were beginning to employ Black and Asian solicitors and clerks in order to extend their client base. When offices were set up in predominantly Black or Asian communities, it was found that legal staff who could speak languages such as Urdu and Gujerati were engaging with a previously untapped source of work. It was by establishing links in those communities that BME solicitors were able to set up as partners in their own practices. – Page 100

States that
Because BME-managed firms tend to set up small niche practices, the BME solicitors in the present study expressed concern at their financial vulnerability during a time of change. Page 109

2010
The Law Society

Earnings and work of private practice solicitors in 2007

Reporting on a representative sample of practitioners by diversity, firm size (with 2-10 partners slightly over represented) grade and age. (Pages 8-10).

Women were more likely to call themselves specialists than men – 82% of women compared to 76% of men – but no ethnic differences were found.

Women were much more likely than men to have undertaken work in fewer areas. Whereas nearly three-quarters of women (72%) had undertaken work in one or two areas, only 59% of men had done the same; nearly one-fifth of men (19%) had undertaken work in five or more areas compared to only 8% of women. On average, men had undertaken 2.76 areas of work and women 2.04.
Pages 11-12

A greater proportion of female solicitors worked with legally aided clients than male practitioners (29% of women compared with 21% of men); and BME solicitors were more likely than white solicitors to do legal aid work (34% of BME solicitors compared to 23% of white solicitors). The proportion of time spent on legally aided clients by legal aid practitioners varied according to gender and ethnicity: whereas 65% of female legal aid solicitors spent more than 50% of their fee earning time on legal aid, this compared with 49% of male legal aid solicitors; and over three-quarters of BME legal aid practitioners (77%) spent more than 50% of their time doing legal aid compared with just over half of white legal aid solicitors (54%).
Page 16

Analysis found that:
The median yearly salary for male solicitors was £60,000 compared to £41,000 for females – a median pay gap of 32%.
After controlling for grade, PQE, region, size of firm worked in, breaks taken, hours worked and area of law (family and conveyancing) female solicitors earned, on average, 7.6% less than male solicitors.

By ethnicity, the median was £50,000 for white solicitors and £40,000 for BME groups – a pay gap of 20%. Taking account of gender, grade, firm size, region, PQE and hours worked solicitors earned, on average, 17% less than white solicitors.
Pages 21-23
Breakdown of ethnicity by partnership size – Page 23

2008
Europe Economics

Report for Bar Council – A critique of the evidence used by the LSC for its BVT proposals

Report indicates large variations in profitability of criminal legal work (in 2006) page 23.

2009
Bar Council

Report of the Analysis of Demographic Data collected from the Practising Bar in November 2007 Prepared for the Bar Council by Dr. Deborah Price and Dr. Anne Laybourne of the Kings Institute for the study of Public Policy 2010.

Report focuses on diversity findings of a survey that achieved a 35% response rate from the self‐employed bar. Provides detailed tables of findings. These show that female barristers in comparison to male barristers are disproportionately junior and that area of specialisation is strongly related to both gender and ethnicity. – Page 6
Of the 15,160 practising barristers in 2007, 5,260 completed the survey.
Overall gender and ethnicity breakdown of the survey respondents found to be representative of all self employed barristers – page 8
Sexual orientation, Gender reassignment, and Disability breakdown of respondents by years of call- pages 9 & 10
Age breakdown of respondents – page 12

Provided detailed analysis is of diversity, full or part time employment and grade of barrister – “”White men are substantially over‐represented in Silk, with 18% of White men at the self‐employed bar in Silk compared with 9% of BME men, 4% of White women and just 2% of BME women. Further, BME men especially (10%), but also BME women (5%), are much more likely to be sole practitioners than White men (3%) and women (2%). Women are 2 – 3 times more likely than men to have probationary, squatter or pupil status than men”" – Page 16 – 18
Detailed analysis of diversity and proportion of work that is publically funded. Page 19
Survey found significant differences in billing and different gender and ethnicity groups:
“”marked differentials in income by gender and ethnicity, with 21% of white men billing less than £80,000 , whereas 39% of BME men do so, 44% of white women, and more than half, 54%, of BME women. Women are also more likely to be billing between £80,000 and £125,000 than men. Over 80% of BME women bill less than £125,000
compared with 43% of white men”". Page 20
Explores link between billing levels, types of practice, and diversity – pages 21-24 – finding statistically significant differences:
In crime for those over 10 years call – “”More than 85% of white and BME women over 10 years call bill less than £125,000 compared with 55% of white men and 44% of BME men.”" – page 25
In Civil differences are significant for both call groups -
Among those 0 – 10 years call, 30% of white men bill more than £125,000 compares with between 12% and 20% for other groups. These differences are accentuated for those over 10 years call, where 81 per cent of white men bill more than £125,000, compared with 62% of BME men, 67% of white women, and 38% of BME women – Page 25
For family work, the research found no significant differences by gender or ethnicity under 10 years call, but did for over 10 years call – “”Forty‐six per cent of white men and 44% of BME men over ten years call bill more than £125,000 compared with 28% of white women and 18% of BME women”" Page 26
This is similar for those in mixed practice – page 26
Analysis of gross billing and disability – pages 27-28
Analysis of gender and ethnic differences in schooling, academic background, working time, and caring responsibilities – pages 30 -32

2010
The Law Society

Solictors working in the employed sector

Number of solicitors by years of PQE, age and ethnicity

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the Wales

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the Yorkshire & Humberside Region

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the West Midlands Region

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the South West Region

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the South East Region

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the North West Region

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the north East Region

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession the Greater London Region

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
The Law Society

The solicitors profession in the East Midlands

Number of solicitors by region, PQE, ethnicity and age, and size of firm

2006
Harvard Law School

Overview of the Professional Services Industry and the Legal Profession

Looking at law firms in the US, legal profession is significantly less diverse than other professions in the US – Page 5

2008
Bar Council

The Future of the Bar by Nicholas Green QC, June 2010

In terms of gender in the self-employed Bar there were 8,381 men and 3,800 women at the end of 2009. Interestingly, in terms of relative percentages women were better represented in the Provinces (1,465/2,996 i.e. circa 50%) than in London (2,387/5,371 i.e. circa 44%). A statistic that is also indicative of the changing gender balance of the Bar is that in 2009, 921 women and 851 men were called to the Bar i.e. 53% of those called were female. Page 9

23% of pupillages are being taken up by people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) backgrounds, which is a higher proportion of inclusion than in the general population. In 1995 the percentage of BME practitioners at the self-employed Bar was 6.4% (376 barristers). By 2005 this had risen to 15% (1,382 barristers). In 2008, 39% of all calls to the Bar were BME. 27% of all BME applicants applying for silk in 2009 were successful and in 2010, out of 35 BME applicants, 17 were successful or 48.6%. Page 10

2010
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Full impact assessment – Higher rights of audience qualification

In June 2009 there were 4995 solicitors with the rights of audience qualification. This represents only four per cent of the total number of practising solicitors. Details of the current holders, broken down by gender, age and race are provided – Page 4

2009
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2009

In 2008–09, excluding those for whom the ethnicity is unknown, solicitors from minority ethnic groups accounted for 11.4% of all solicitors on the Roll, 10.6% of all solicitors with practising certificates, and 9.8% of all solicitors in private practice.

  • •Women now account for 45.2% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1999 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 45.2%, the number of women holding practising certificates has nearly doubled, having increased by 86.9%.
  • 76.7% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to only 70.2% of women.
  • In 2009 the average age of a male practising certificate holder was 44.2 years compared to only 37.9 years for female practising certificate holders.
  • In 2009, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 37.2 years compared with 44.4 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 50.9 years compared with 47.1 years for partners and 41.3 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Over one-third of practising certificate holders in 2009 (37.1%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of just under half (49.3%) of minority ethnic group practising certificate holders.

Page 5

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 9
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 10
Increase in Practising certificate holders since 1979 -
Since 1999, the total number of solicitors with practising certificates has grown by 45.2%. However, over this period the number of women solicitors with practising certificates has increased by 86.9% whilst the number of men increased by only 22.7%. The proportion of female solicitors holding practising certificates was 45.2% at 31 July 2009, compared with 35.1% in 1999. For the past ten years, women have accounted for over one-half of new entrants to the profession, so this proportion is set to increase for the foreseeable future. Page 12
Age breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates and number of years qualified – Page 13
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 15
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, status, size of firm – Pages 17-20

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 42
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 43-51

2009
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2004

In 2003–04, solicitors drawn from minority ethnic groups accounted for 9.2% of solicitors on the Roll, 8.3% of solicitors with practising certificates, and 7.9% of solicitors in private practice.

  • Women now account for 40.5% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1994 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 52.1%, the number of women holding practising certificates more than doubled, having increased by 112.8%.
  • 80.8% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to 72.9% of women.
  • Of those solicitors with 10–19 years’ experience in private practice, 73.0% of men were partners or sole practitioners compared with only 48.8% of women.
  • In 2004, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 36.5 years compared with 43.4 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 50.4 years compared with 45.8 years for partners and 40.8 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Just over one-third of practising certificate holders in 2004 (35.3%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of 50.4% of ethnic minority practising certificate holders.

Page 6 & 7

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 11
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 12
Increase in Praticising certificate holders since 1950 – Page 13
Breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates by gender and number of years qualified – Page 15
Gender breakdown by category of employment – page 16
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 17
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, and status – Pages 19-22

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 46
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 47-55

2004
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2003

In 2002–03, solicitors drawn from the ethnic minorities accounted for 8.8% of solicitors on the Roll, 7.9% of solicitors with practising certificates, and 7.5% of solicitors in private practice.

  • Women now account for 39.7% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1993 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 51.2%, the number of women holding practising certificates more than doubled, having increased by 117.5%.
  • 81.5% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to 73.2% of women.
  • Of those solicitors with 10–19 years’ experience in private practice, 78.7% of men were partners or sole practitioners compared with only 52.1% of women.
  • In 2003, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 36.3 years compared with 43.2 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 50.3 years compared with 45.4 years for partners and 40.6 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Just over one-third of practising certificate holders in 2003 (37.4%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of 54.3% of ethnic minority practising certificate holders.

Page 6 & 7

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 11
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 12
Increase in Praticising certificate holders since 1950 – Page 13
Breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates by gender and number of years qualified – Page 15
Gender breakdown by category of employment – page 16
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 17
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, and status – Pages 19-22

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 46
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 47-55

2003
Louise Ashley

Making a Difference? The Use (and Abuse) of Diversity Management at the UK’s Elite Law Firms

How diversity is managed in law firms

2009
Bar Council

Gender and Ethnicity Percentages on Barristers in Practice from 2004-8

Gender and Ethnicity Percentages on Barristers in Practice from 2004-8

2008
The Law Society

Gender and earnings in private practice

Earnings by diversity

2009
Solicitors Regulation Authority

SRA Equality & Diversity annual monitoring report of regulatory activity

Diversity of Solicitors profession (in terms of lawyers, not firms) is summarised repeatedly throughout report.

2008
Bar Council

Called to the Bar by Ethnicity and Gender

Called to the Bar by Ethnicity and Gender

2010
Bar Council

BVC & Pupilage Diversity statistics – 2001-2008

BVC & Pupilage Diversity statistics – 2001-2008

2009
The Law Society

Women Solicitors

Breakdown of women solicitors, including comparison of work types by gender

2009
The Law Society

Women Solicitors

Breakdown of women solicitors, including comparison of work types by gender

2005
The Law Society

Trainee solictors and remuneration

Breakdown of trainee solicitors pay by size of firm and diversity

2006
Bar Council

Self-Employed Bar by Ethnicity and Gender

Breakdown of self employed barristers by ethnicity and gender

2009
The Law Society

Legal Aid & the solicitors profession

Breakdown of legal aid providers by age, ethnicity & gender

2007
The Law Society

Legal Aid & the solicitors profession

Breakdown of legal aid providers by age, ethnicity & gender

2006
Legal Advice Sector Partnership Steering Group

Advice forward: developing skills for the future

Breakdown of legal advice entities, by number of employees (page 9).
Not available online

2006
The Law Society

Job Satisfaction in the solicitors profession

Breakdown of job satisfaction by gender

2005
Bar Council

Employed Bar by Ethnicity and Gender

Breakdown of employed barristers by ethnicity and gender

2009
Bar Council

Self employed barristers 2010

Breakdown of diversity of the bar by employed, self employed and called to the Bar.

2008
The Law Society

Categories of Work Undertaken by Solictors

Breakdown of categories of work undertaken by solicitors including gender

2010
The Law Society

Categories of Work Undertaken by Solictors

Breakdown of categories of work undertaken by solicitors including gender

2006
Bar Council

Overview Annual Bar Statistics 2009

Breakdown of barristers by gender and rank

2009
National Audit Office

Solicitor Survey for Criminal Legal Aid Growth For Knowledge

Breakdown of age and ethnicity of criminal legal aid firms by turnover and number of partners – page 13-17

2009
Bar Council

Called to the Bar by Ethnicity and Gender

Breakdown of  barristers by ethnicity and gender

2009
Bar Standards Board

Bar Vocation & Pupliage diversity data 2000-2008

Bar Vocation & Pupliage diversity data 2000-2008

2008
Institute of Chartered Accountants of England & Wales

Flexible futures: Flexible working and work-life integration in the accountancy profession Lewis & Cooper

Analysis of demand for flexible working practices in Accountancy – Page 5

2010
Kings College London

The Work of the Family Bar Report of the Week-At-A-Glance Survey 2008 Debora Price PhD & Anne Laybourne MSc

Almost 60% of family barristers are female, but women are over-represented in having specialist public and private law children practices (66%, 64%), and under-represented in having specialist ancillary relief practices (37%).
Page xvii

Women, and especially BME women have substantially lower taxable profits than men, especially White men. Median profits for White men are £79,000 per annum, for BME men £65,000 per annum, White women, £60,000 per annum and BME women, £52,000 per annum. xviii

BME women earn the least per hour (median £60), with White men earning the most
(median £82).

White male family barristers, 36% derive less than 20% of their turnover from family legal aid, and among BME male family barristers this is 31%. Among women, however, 19% of White female family barristers derive less than 20% of their turnover from family legal aid, and only 11% of BME female family barristers. This gender/ethnicity split is evident at the other end of the distribution too – those who are heavily dependent on family legal aid for more than 80% of their income are disproportionately female, and disproportionately BME women. While only 9% of White male family barristers derive more than 80% of their turnover from family legal aid, this is 14% of BME men, 17% of White women and 22% of BME women. More than half of BME female family barristers (52%) derive more than 60% of their turnover from family legal aid.
Page 26
The median taxable profits of White men are £79,009, compared with £65,240 for BME men, £60,000 for White women, and £52,326 for BME women. The median turnover has a similar profile – £107,400 for White men, £83,782 for BME men, £85,627 for White women and £70,444 for BME women
Page 27

Effective hourly rates of pay:
How case is funded (private client, local authority, and legal aid)
Region
Years of call
Diversity
Sub specialism’s
Complexity
Court
- Pages 54-56

2008
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2008

  • In 2007–08, excluding those for whom the ethnicity is unknown, solicitors from minority ethnic groups accounted for 10.7% of all solicitors on the Roll, 10.0% of all solicitors with practising certificates, and 9.5% of all solicitors in private practice.
  • Women now account for 44.4% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1998 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 49.8%, the number of women holding practising certificates has nearly doubled, having increased by 96.2%.
  • 77.2% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to only 70.3% of women.
  • In 2008 the average age of a male practising certificate holder was 44.1 years compared to only 37.7 years for female practising certificate holders.
  • In 2008, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 37.1 years compared with 44.3 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 51.2 years compared with 46.7 years for partners and 41.3 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Just over one-third of practising certificate holders in 2008 (36.7%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of just over half (50.2%) of minority ethnic group practising certificate holders.

Page 5

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 9
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 10
Increase in Practising certificate holders since 1950 -
Since 1998, the total number of solicitors with practising certificates has grown by 49.8%. However,
over this period the number of women solicitors with practising certificates has increased by 96.2%
whilst the number of men increased by only 26.0%. The proportion of solicitors holding practising
certificates who are women was 44.4% at 31 July 2008, compared with 33.9% in 1998. For the past
ten years, women have accounted for over one-half of new entrants to the profession, so this
proportion is set to increase for the foreseeable future. Page 12
Age breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates and number of years qualified – Page 13
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 15
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, status, size of firm – Pages 17-20

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 42
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 43-51

2008
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2007

  • In 2006–07, solicitors from minority ethnic groups accounted for 10.1% of all solicitors on the Roll, 9.5% of all solicitors with practising certificates, and 9.1% of all solicitors in private practice.
  • Women now account for 43.4% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1997 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 51.3%, the number of women holding practising certificates more than doubled, having increased by 100.6%.
  • 79.0% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to 72.4% of women.
  • In 2007, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 36.9 years compared with 44.1 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 51.0 years compared with 46.6 years for partners and 41.1 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Just over one-third of practising certificate holders in 2007 (36.4%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of 50.3% of minority ethnic group practising certificate holders.

Page 5

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 9
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 10
Increase in Practising certificate holders since 1950 -
Since 1997, the total number of solicitors with practising certificates has grown by 51.3%. However, over this period the number of women solicitors with practising certificates has increased by 100.6% whilst the number of men increased by only 27.3%. The proportion of solicitors holding practising certificates who are women was 43.4% at 31 July 2007, compared with 32.8% in 1997. For the past ten years, women have accounted for over one-half of new entrants to the profession, so this proportion is set to increase for the foreseeable future. Page 12
Age breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates and number of years qualified – Page 13
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 15
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, status, size of firm – Pages 17-20

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 42
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 43-51

2007
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2006

  • In 2005–06, solicitors drawn from minority ethnic groups accounted for 9.7% of solicitors on the Roll, 9.1% of solicitors with practising certificates, and 8.7% of solicitors in private practice.
  • Women now account for 42.5% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1996 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 53.7%, the number of women holding practising certificates more than doubled, having increased by 107.9%.
  • 78.9% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to only 73.3% of women.
  • Just over one-half, 52.7%, of current practising solicitors have been qualified for 10 years or less.
  • In 2005–06 35.7% of private practitioners were listed as being either partners or sole practitioners compared to 39.8% the year before.
  • Of those solicitors with 10–19 years’ experience in private practice, 60.0% of men were partners or sole practitioners compared with only 40.3% of women.
  • In 2006, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 36.7 years compared with 43.9 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 51.1 years compared with 46.7 years for partners and 41.0 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Just over one-third of practising certificate holders in 2006 (36.4%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of over half (50.6%) of ethnic minority practising certificate holders.

Page 6-7

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 11
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 12
Increase in Practising certificate holders since 1950 -
Since 1996, the total number of solicitors with practising certificates has grown by 53.7%; however, over this period the number of women solicitors with practising certificates has increased by 107.9% whilst the number of men increased by only 28.9%. The proportion of solicitors holding practising certificates who are women was 42.5% at 31 July 2006, compared with 31.4% in 1996. For the past ten years, women have accounted for over one-half of new entrants to the profession, so this proportion is set to increase at least for the foreseeable future. Page 14
Age breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates and number of years qualified – Page 15
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 17
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, status, size of firm – Pages 19-22

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 46
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 47-55

2006
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2005

  • In 2004–05, solicitors drawn from minority ethnic groups accounted for 9.4% of solicitors on the Roll, 8.7% of solicitors with practising certificates, and 8.3% of solicitors in private practice.
  • Women now account for 41.6% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1995 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 52.7%, the number of women holding practising certificates more than doubled, having increased by 110.5%.
  • 80.3% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to 73.2% of women.
  • Of those solicitors with 10–19 years’ experience in private practice, 67.8% of men were partners or sole practitioners compared with only 45.4% of women.
  • In 2005, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 36.6 years compared with 43.7 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 50.8 years compared with 46.3 years for partners and 40.9 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Just over one-third of practising certificate holders in 2005 (36.3%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of 51.2% of ethnic minority practising certificate holders.

Page 6-7

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 11
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 12
Increase in Practising certificate holders since 1950 -
Since 1995, the total number of solicitors with practising certificates has grown by 52.7%; however, over this period the number of women solicitors with practising certificates has increased by 110.5% whilst the number of men increased by only 27.7%. The proportion of solicitors holding practising certificates who are women was 41.6% at 31 July 2005, compared with 30.1% in 1995. For the past ten years, women have accounted for over one-half of new entrants to the profession, so this proportion is set to increase at least for the foreseeable future. Page 14
Age breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates and number of years qualified – Page 15
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 17
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, status, size of firm – Pages 19-22

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 46
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 47-55

2005
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2002

  • In 2001–02, solicitors from ethnic minorities accounted for 8.1% of solicitors on the Roll, 7.0% of solicitors with practising certificates, and 6.7% of solicitors in private practice.
  • Women now account for 38.6% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1992 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 49.5%, the number of women holding practising certificates more than doubled, having increased by 119.5%.
  • 82.0% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to 74.9% of women.

Page 5 & 6

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 9
Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 10
Increase in Praticising certificate holders since 1950 – Page 11
Breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates by gender and number of years qualified – Page 13
Gender breakdown by category of employment – page 14
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 15
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, and status – Pages 17-21

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 43
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 44-52

2002
The Law Society

Trends in the solicitors’ profession Annual statistical report 2001

  • In 2000-2001, solicitors from ethnic minorities accounted for 7.9% of solicitors on the Roll, 6.6% of solicitors with practising certificates, and 6.3% of solicitors in private practice.
  • Women now account for 37.4% of solicitors with practising certificates. Whereas since 1991 the total number of solicitors holding practising certificates has grown by 51.5%, the number of women holding practising certificates more than doubled, having increased by 128.5%.
  • 81.9% of men holding practising certificates work within private practice, compared to 74.4% of women.
  • Of those solicitors with 10-19 years’ experience in private practice, 82.9% of men were partners or sole practitioners compared with only 56.6% of women.
  • In 2001, the average age of a female solicitor in private practice was 36.0 years compared with 43.0 years for men. The average age of a sole practitioner was 49.8 years compared with 44.9 years for partners and 40.5 years for all solicitors in private practice.
  • Around one-third of practising certificate holders in 2001 (35.9%) were employed by organisations based in London. These organisations were responsible for the employment of 53.1% of ethnic minority practising certificate holders.

Page 6 & 7

Gender breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 13

Ethnicity breakdown of solicitors on the roll with & without practising certificates – Page 14

Increase in Praticising certificate holders since 1950 – Page 15

Breakdown of solicitors with practising certificates by gender and number of years qualified – Page 17

Gender breakdown by category of employment – page 18
Position of solicitors working in private practice by gender – Page 19
Ethnicity of solicitors in private practice by gender, region, and status – Pages 21-24

Trainees starting salaries by region & Gender – page 64
Diversity of Admissions to the solicitors roll – pages 65-73

2001