Organisation Description Year
University of Westminster

Capital Markets: Those who can and Cannot Do the Purest Global Law Markets

Discussion on the use of accountancy firms

2001
Fordham Law Review

Supply Chains & Porous Boundaries: The Disaggregation of Legal Services, Milton C Regan Jr & Palmer T Heenan

Importance of reputation of an organisation when consumers find it difficult to evaluate the quality of the service – page 2156

2010
Co-Operative Society

Co-operative legal services – consultation response Jonathan Gulliford Director Co-operative Legal Services

In the consumer legal services market there are no existing household brands. As a result consumers end up playing a yellow-pages lottery to access legal help and assistance and they are very nervous about it. CLS believes that as a result of this nervousness many people who need legal advice and assistance never take it. Companies with which people already have an affinity

2009
Citizens Advice

What clients and other groups say about advice services Simon Bottery Director of Communications

Quotes MORI poll in 2005 that found that:
Levels of awareness amongst general public of advice agencies:

2008
Department for Constitutional Affairs

The organisational structure of legal firms; A discussion of the recommendations of the 2004 review of the regulatory framework for legal services in England and Wales – Richard A. Brealey and Julian R. Franks

RAC as potential entrant – page 18

2005
Jures

Shopping Around – What consumers want from the new legal services market

Appendix 1 – Q2 – responses to most trusted brand – page 16

2010
The Law Society

LSB consultation on introducing Alternative Business Structures

covers the existence of Which, Co-op and Halifax as big brand legal advisors (page 6).

2009
Byfield Consultancy

Big Bang Report: Opportunities and threats in the new legal services market Jon Robbins

Development of brand names – Quality Solicitors – page 3, page 13 & page 14 – Case study page 24
Potential New Entrants Case studies – Co-Op, Halifax, A4e, Which, DAS pages 31-36

2010
Solicitors Regulation Authority

A survey of public attitudes towards conveyancing services, conducted on behalf of: Solicitors Regulation Authority

In the conveyancing market, there is scepticism about using a solicitor recommended by an estate agent if a commission is paid for that referral (page 6).

2009
The Law Society

More civil justice? The impact of the Woolf reforms on pre-action behaviour

Lawyers are also customers in terms of referral firms – from claims intermediatories (page 22).

2002
Vanilla Research

Referral Arrangements Research

Referrals fees (in all industry sectors) are generally seen as acceptable (page 14). But low awareness – and indignation – that they exist in the legal sector (page 15-16). No reason why this should be the case – experiences of referral partners is mixed (page 17). Different levels of acceptance among PI claimants (page 19). Objections mainly practical – price and suitability, not conflicts or access to justice (page 20 – 22). Suggests addressed by transparency (page 25).

2010
Bar Council

Submission by the Bar Council of England and Wales to the Legal Services Consumer Panel’s Call for Evidence on Referral Arrangements

Report refers to another report, which said that many solicitors weren’t complying with referral rules (page 6).

2010
Moulton Hall Market Research

Referral arrangement and legal services research report

Study suggests that clients care about them (page 58).

2007
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Regulating and Deregulating Lawyers

Summary of paper discussing referral fees in English legal market (page 6). Summary is to brief to evaluate what report may contain.

2010
Legal Services Board

Referral fees – access to justice or road to hell?

Summary of research into referral fees – most consumers didn’t seem to know that lawyers paid them (page 7).

2010
Association of British Insurers

MARKETING COSTS FOR PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS Evidence of market failure Report from Oxera Consulting Limited

Table showing estimates of referral fees paid in across different areas of law – page 35
“In absolute terms, referral fees paid by PI claimant solicitor firms are much higher than estimates available for other areas of legal work. For example, the referral fee for consultancy law, where the use of intermediaries is also common practice, is typically one-sixth or less than that paid by PI claimant solicitor firms (Moulton Hall Ltd 2007).” Page 36

2009
Association of British Insurers

ABI’s response to the Legal Services Consumer Panel Investigation into referral arrangements

ABI wants referral fees banned and claims referral fees have risen in some cases from

2010
The Law Society

Submission to OFT in connection with its market study into home buying and selling

Discussion on referrals fees in relation to estate agents, but about whether customers understand them (page 21)

2009
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Consumer research study: a survey of public attitudes towards solicitors

Many unaware of the SRA and who regulates who

2008
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Interim research findings: consumer attitudes to the purchase of legal services GfK

Reports findings of 40 in-depth interviews. Found no awareness of legal services regulators and the regulatory system – slide 5.

“There is a high level of faith in legal services providers:

2010
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Consumer attitudes towards the purchase of legal services

Summaries results of 40 intervies by GFK, report states that:
Consumers tend to go with a provider reccomeded by a firm, do limited research about different providers, are loyal to previous providers. – page 5
Consumers look for an established provider based on a recommendation from someone they trust, evidence that the provider is experienced in legal practice, and evidence that a provider specialises in there required areas. Confirms service standards and price assessed after purchase.
Consumers see solictor as a indication of quality, and gives them confidence they are purchasing services from a reliable provider. Assume all professionals and staff are qualified to do thier job. – Page 6
Consumers expect all legal services to be regulated, and expected levels of protection similar to existing regulation. Page 7
Consmers unclear as to what represnts good value for money – Page 8

2011
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Interim research findings: consumer attitudes to the purchase of legal services GfK

Reports findings of 40 in-depth interviews. Found no awareness of legal services regulators and the regulatory system – slide 5.

“There is a high level of faith in legal services providers:

2010
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Consumer attitudes towards the purchase of legal services

Summaries results of 40 intervies by GFK, report states that:
Consumers tend to go with a provider reccomeded by a firm, do limited research about different providers, are loyal to previous providers. – page 5
Consumers look for an established provider based on a recommendation from someone they trust, evidence that the provider is experienced in legal practice, and evidence that a provider specialises in there required areas. Confirms service standards and price assessed after purchase.
Consumers see solictor as a indication of quality, and gives them confidence they are purchasing services from a reliable provider. Assume all professionals and staff are qualified to do thier job. – Page 6
Consumers expect all legal services to be regulated, and expected levels of protection similar to existing regulation. Page 7
Consmers unclear as to what represnts good value for money – Page 8

2011
Melbourne Law School

The Common law of contracts: Are broad principles better than detailed ones? An empirical investigation

Australian research showing that broad principles are more easily understood and lead to more predictable outcomes than detailed rules in contract law.

2005
Citizens Advice

Geography of advice: An overview of the challenges facing the Community Legal Service

CAB survey respondents doubtful that CLS has improved access to information or legal advice (page 12).

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Piecing it Together: Exploring One-Stop Shop Legal Service Delivery in Community Legal Advice Centres

Client confusion between CLAC and CAB identity, and assumed that they were fully staffed by volunteers.
Most had to be directed, referred or signposted there by others. In contrast, those clients whose perceptions of the CLAC were based on the long-standing, recognisable, and trusted brand of the Citizens Advice Bureau found it easier to access the service because they felt they knew something about what the service offered and who could go there – Page 35

2010
Ministry of Justice

Baseline survey to assess legal services reform: Consumers experience of using legal services for personal matters

Consumers knowledge & confidence of the legal services market – pages 24-26

2010
ACCA

Providing human resources / employment advice to SMEs: the role of SMPs

Discusses what resources SMEs draw on to inform themselves of HR issues (page 36 – 37).

2010
Financial Services Authority

Financial capability: a behavioural economics perspective – David de Meza, Bernd Irlenbusch, Diane Reyniers

How consumers interact with other complex services

2008
Ministry of Justice

Just satisfaction? What drives public and participant satisfaction with courts and tribunals

In relation to the COURTS service, how people learn about it is discussed on pages 23 – 25. Discussion on information provided to court users (page 40 – 43).

2008
University of Toledo

The Death of Ethics? Conflict of Interest in One Leg of the Three-Legged Stool of Lawyer Regulation

p6 Discussion how disclosure could result in worse outcomes for consumers due to changes in lawyer behaviour

2010
Citizens Advice

What clients and other groups say about advice services Simon Bottery Director of Communications

Quotes MORI poll in 2005 that found that:
Levels of awareness amongst general public of advice agencies:

2008
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Interim research findings: consumer attitudes to the purchase of legal services GfK

Reports findings of 40 in-depth interviews. Suggests that those who purchase legal services are not necessarily

2010
Legal Services Board

LSB Initial consumer research – Summary

Around four in ten of those sampled were not confident that they could judge how good a service from their lawyer was. Furthermore, two thirds would not know how to go about making a complaint if they were unsatisfied with the service they received. the same proportion of people thought that they could not judge how good a service from an accountant was. More felt unable to judge service from MPs and financial advisers. Professions that consumers felt better able to judge included GPs, teachers and police officers.
In the end, despite their belief that they could not judge the quality of service, two-thirds said that they would recommend their lawyer.

2009
Plenet

Legal Capability Martin Jones

Reports on Legal capability, an important aspect of how consumers interact with law.

Legal Capability can be defined as the abilities that a person needs to deal effectively with law-related issues. These capabilities fall into three areas: knowledge, skills and attitudes, emphasising that capability needs to go beyond knowledge of the law, to encompass skills like the ability to communicate plus attitudes like confidence and determination.

The knowledge people need is to:
* Be aware of civil law and recognise legal issues
* Know where to find out more
* Understand the issues
* Know the routes to a solution
* Know where to go to get help
The skills required are the ability to:
* Communicate effectively
* Make decisions
* Plan ahead
* Keep track of calls and correspondence
The attitudes needed are:

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Report of the 2007 English and Welsh Civil and Social Justice Survey

Survey found that -
At the time of the problem, did you know what your legal rights were relating to this problem?
63% did not know their legal rights

At the time of the problem did you know what formal processes(such as court proceedings and tribunals) are sometimes used to deal with these sorts of problems?
68% suggested that they had no knowledge of processes

only 23% knew their rights and the processes

Those who knew their rights met all of their objectives 59%of the time compared to only 29%for those who did not know their rights.

2008
Legal Services Research Centre

Legal education in an unlikely spot: Istanbul prisonsIdil Elveris

Value of legal education in empowering clients – page 2

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Money Advice Outreach Evaluation: Qualitative Outcomes for Clients

Within survey cohort, there was a reasonably high level of knowledge about clients about the availability of free advice. But people just seek advice even if they know about it in general (page 6).

2008
Journal of Information, Law and Technology

Law firm clients as drivers of law firm change

Competent may be generic “good enough” – the latent legal market idea (page 4)

2002
Financial Services Authority

Depolarisation disclosure – mystery shopping results – Roy Findlay and Jola Krzeminska

Level so service in financial services industry

2006
Bar Standards Board

Perceptions of barristersResearch study conducted for the Bar Standards Board by IPSOS MORINovember 2007

Perceptions of barristers services – pages 13-14
Satisfaction with barristers services in terms of the general public, prisoners, solicitor & other instructors using a 9 point service scale – Pages 15-19

2007
Legal Services Research Centre

Piecing it Together:Exploring One-Stop Shop Legal Service Delivery in Community Legal Advice Centres

Physical environment does play a role in accessibility – a nice seating area, leaflets and water. Clients appreciate when facilities are made available for young children. Toilets and refreshment facilities were also important.
Overall, however, clients gave the sense that they were more interested in the quality of advice and service they received than the physical surroundings they received it in. – Page 46

2010
Eclipse Legal

Co-operative Legal Services (CLS) selects Eclipse…!

Proclaim will be utilised across the whole CLS product portfolio, maintaining client data and providing in-depth workflows to enable fast case progression with maximum levels of resilience and accuracy. CLS intends to make full use of Proclaims toolkits which will enable in-house administrators to manage and enhance workflow steps ‘on the fly’ to tailor and streamline the firm’s services as and when client demand dictates. Functionalities such as SMS text messaging and online case tracking will prove vital in keeping consumer clients up-to-date and providing an overall transparency of service

2006
Legal Services Policy Institute

Quality, Values and Standards: the future legal landscape

Yes

2010
The Law Society

Risk Management GuideApril 2009

Common reasons for PII claims stem from:
- Failure to comply with time limits (60% of personal injury claims, 30% across other categories of work)
- Communication problems with the client
- Lack of supervision
- Cases being handled at too low a level
- Delay often caused by inexperience stress or overwork
- Breach of undertakings
Page 2

2009
A4e/Howells

Solutions to legal provisions emerging from outside of legal service

Suggests customers want accessibility, affordability, quality and control (page 5).

2010
University of Westminster

Postmodern professions? The fragmentation of legal education and the legal profession – Andy Boon, John Flood, Julian Webb

This report discusses what competencies lawyers should have.

2005
Ministry of Justice

Just satisfaction? What drives public and participant satisfaction with courts and tribunals

This report focuses on satisfaction – and asks what the concept means. Might be analogous to competent? (page 14 – 16). Is perception linked with outcomes? (page18-19). Generally high satisfaction levels for judiciary (page 59).

2008
Legal Services Board

LSB Initial consumer research – Summary

Three-quarters of people were satisfied or very satisfied with the legal advice they had received. Women (78%) were more likely to be satisfied than men (73%), satisfaction also increased with income and social grade. London proved the most satisfied. Despite the relatively high satisfaction levels, only half of people thought that their lawyer was good value and one quarter felt that they were poor value for money.
In the end, despite their belief that they could not judge the quality of service, two-thirds said that they would recommend their lawyer.

2009
Ministry of Justice

Baseline survey to assess legal services reform: Consumers experience of using legal services for personal matters

Breakdown of current service standard in the market – looking at initial information, who handled the matter, communication, length of time, and how users rated the service they received. Pages 15 to 19
Problems and complaints about legal services – pages 22-24.

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Causes of Action: Civil Law and Social JusticeThe Final Report of the First LSRC Survey of Justiciable Problems – Revised 2nd Edition

Satisfaction with Advisers – pages 120-122
Objectives in resolving problems – pages 135 -139

2006
Legal Services Research Centre

Understanding advice seeking behaviour: further findings from the LSRC survey of justiciable problems

Easily accessible sources of information, which may lead to the early settlement of disputes (page 5).

2004
Co-Operative Society

Co-op legal services

Following widespread research, members told us that the legal industry communicates poorly, uses too much jargon and they are confused about the pricing of services.

2006
RIAD

Market mechanisms in dispute resolution: the position of legal expenses insurance Prof. Dr Heico Kerkmeester

Demand for LEI -
dependant on probability & cost trade off, desirability of credible threat, belief in availability of legal aid or other social insurance. Page 2

2005
Department for Business Innovation & Skills

Something for nothing? Employment Tribunal claimants’ perspectives on legal funding

Discussion about what aspects of advisor service claimants value (pages 58 – 62). Expertise is just one element.

2009
Jures

Shopping Around – What consumers want from the new legal services market

Appendix 1 – Q3 – willingness for LEI – page 16
Appendix 1 – Q5 & Q6 – preference for face to face services – page 16
Appendix 1 – Q8 – Expectation that the state will pay for those who cannot afford it – page 16
Appendix 2 – Q6 & 7 – views on legal aid and income – page 17

2010
Fordham Law Review

Supply Chains & Porous Boundaries: The Disaggregation of Legal Services, Milton C Regan Jr & Palmer T Heenan

Large corporation services needs – page 2155

2010
Solicitors Journal

What are legal aid lawyers for?

Article suggests that what’s needed is a system that protects rights in the first place, not enforces them afterwards (page 30).

2010
Office of Fair Trading

Home buying and selling A Market Study February 2010

Levels of delay as a result of solicitors/Conveyancers – Chart 7.30: Who/what was responsible for delay

2010
Commonwealth secretariat

Reform of the legal profession in Australia – Michael Kirby

Australian study suggests that most complaints about solicitors are due to costs (page 4-5).

2010
Consumer Focus

Law Society consumer event: Bridging the gapPhilip Cullum, Deputy Chief Executive, Consumer Focus February 2011

Listing what consumers want form the Legal Services Market:
- Services that are affordable and easy to access, and that are suitable for all parts of society
- A reasonable (though not excessive) range of options in terms of both providers and products, which will meet their own particular needs
- Competition and choice, which in turn drives innovation
- Clear charges with clarity about what you

2011
Legal Services Research Centre

Piecing it Together:Exploring One-Stop Shop Legal Service Delivery in Community Legal Advice Centres

LSRC Research found that:
The location of the CLACs was an important factor in clients experiences of accessibility to advice, and being near to public transport is very important. Clients also valued being able to drop in to the advice centre when visiting the city for other purposes rather than being able to make a special trip.
Page 32
One of the elements of the CLAC which was identified by clients and advisors as key to the accessibility of advice was having a number of advisors under one roof with a range of specialism’s. This was seen as a real benefit of the CLAC set-up. In particular, advisors were keen to highlight that it reduced the amount of travel clients would need to make when referrals were made for specialist advice in a number of problem areas.
Clients see limited opening hours as an obstacle, and wanted longer opening hours – particularly for those working during the day.
Pages 33-34
Clients also would have liked more direct access to legal advice and suggested telephone advice lines as an alternative to having to wait at the drop-in service as a way of identifying client needs and making specialist appointments – page 44

A key theme identified in clients? accounts of their experiences of advice seeking in the CLACs was the need for all members of staff, throughout the process, to deal with them in a non-judgemental manner.
Also reports on the importance client aftercare. – Page 50

Clients wanted welcoming staff, face to face services that are personal, no time wasting and credible staff. – Page 58

Immediate access to advice – page 66

The importance of advisors telling clients that they could come to the CLAC with paperwork relevant to the case brought relief to clients. Knowing that present and future paperwork would be taken into account increased client’s confidence in their advice journey – Page 85
Importance of sharing information internally – One of the specific challenges when dealing with repeat clients was the sharing and accessing of information and paperwork. Having information systems that ran across the CLAC service was vital to managing these repeat returners. Page 88
Clients, in particular the most vulnerable clients, were keen for their advice journey to include some form of aftercare. They seemed to want information for a number of reasons, including for reassurance that

2010
The Law Society

Review of the regulation of corporate legal work

Corporate clients will sue, swap firms or ask for a discount if they’re not happy with their advice – the generally don’t need a regulator to protect them (page 13)

2009
Changing Ageing Partnership

Digital divide, older people and online legal advice

Older consumers are put off by legal jargon and uncertainty over costs

2009
National Audit Office

Citizen Redress: What citizens can do if things go wrong with public services Report by the Comptroller and Auditor General HC 21 Session 2004-2005 9 March 2005

On appeals and tribunals cases around a quarter of people expect that their case might be resolved within
a month, and rather more estimate either two to three months. A fifth of people expect appeals or tribunals

2005
Legal Services Consumer Panel

Quality in Legal Services

Page 8: reference to Vanilla research survey which said that, when asked what they wanted from their lawyer, they emphasised customer service, rather than the technical quality of the advice. They identified six characteristics of

2010
Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics

The two faces of lawyers: professional ethics and business compliance with regulation – Christine Parker, Robert Rosen and Vibeke Nielson

Paper points out that clients want different things from their lawyers – i.e. to provide information, regulate clients behaviour etc (page 208). Fight for their clients (page 212).

2009
Legal Services Research Centre

Criminal defence services: users’ perspective

Police station attendees wanted choice of lawyer (page 3).

2008
Unbiased.co.uk

Legal Advice Report

33% of people chose a solicitor because they specialised in the type of advice they were looking for. 29% chose a solicitor based on the recommendation of someone they trusted and 24% went with a solicitor with a strong reputation that they were familiar with. 23% chose a solicitor that was based near their work or home address.

74% (8,840,780 people) said the solicitor they visited offered exactly what they were looking for.

Of the 26% who were not completely satisfied with the service they received:

6% thought they could have got the support at a lower cost
8% thought they could have found someone more specialised
2% thought they could have found someone based more locally
2% thought they could have found someone they got on better with
5% thought they could have found someone whose professionalism they trusted more
1% said they didn

2009
Legal Services Research Centre

Legal expenses insurance: preconditions, pitfalls and challenges – Matthias Killian

German data on what clients are looking for when selecting law advisors – specialisation, friendliness, size etc (page 12).

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Money Advice Outreach Evaluation:Cost and Effectiveness of the Outreach Pilots

Potential indication of desire for wider range of access points:
Report looked at 10 groups of outreach locations for debt advice -
i. Family support services

2008
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Consumer research study: experiences of black and minority ethnic people using solicitors in England and Wales

71% of BME people believe it is important for their solicitor to have an office in their local neighbourhood

2009
Society of Trust & Estate Practitioners

Trusted advisor: THE FUTURE A report on the future of UK trust and estate practice by the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners

Highlights increasing resistance from clients to pay by the hour, wanting fixed fees. – page 10

Clients ability to access the internet for information is leading to demands for higher value added service.

2010
University College London

Legal aid and access to justice: back to basics?

Summary of what citizens want from legal services market (page 14).

2009
Department for Constitutional Affairs

A trouble shared – legal problems clusters in solicitors

Report suggests that people face “legal problems” but clusters of problems to which the law may offer one solution (page 3). Outlines clusters of demand (page 4)

2006
KMPG

KPMG Impact of the Legal Services Act UK, Survey of Major Companies 2008

Survey of 28 clients from the corporate legal services market. Report includes some descriptions of what these consumers want.

2008
Legal Services Research Centre

Pyschiatric morbidity and people’s experience of and response to social problems involving rights – NJ Balmer, P Pleasence and A Buck

Report suggests that there should be closer integration between legal and mental health services (page 13). Example cited on page 15.

2010
Ministry of Justice

Public opinion and the jury: an international literature review – Julian Roberts and Mike Hough

The public, in general, likes trial by jury (page i). Further data on this point, page iv. And on page 14 (specifically, in England & Wales).

2009
Cardiff University

The Advice Needs of Lone Parents Richard Moorhead, Mark Sefton and Gillian Douglas

Reports Lone parent perceptions of providers on process and outcomes:
Solicitors – Lone parents were likely to agree that they could speak to solictors when they wanted to, the advice given was tailored to thier propblem, and tehy understood what was happening.
62 per cent were satisfied overall with the help that they received and 30 per cent were not satisfied. Similar proportions would use the solicitor again (61 per cent) and 35 per cent said they would not.
Solictors perfromed fairly well on process indicators, but less well on outcomes:
it was clear that levels of agreement among respondents in
the telephone survey with the suggestion that solicitors had helped improve their situation were very low, and on balance solicitors were not perceived as helping with practical problems or as reducing stress or psychological problems. There was only modest agreement that lone parents

2004
Legal Services Board

Legal Advice for Small Businesses Qualitative Research

Barriers to legal advice and sources of satisfaction/dissatisfaction with legal services – slides 36-37

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Report of the 2007 English and Welsh Civil and Social Justice Survey

Use of advisers – pages 53 -60
Attitudes to the justice system – pages 64-65

2008
Lawyer Locator

The Future of Small Law Firms Jeopardy or Opportunity

Reports on research by You Gov, commissioned by Lawyer Locator, that found that:
that the consumer wants a local, approachable, specialised legal service. Furthermore, practitioners who are taking on a

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Report of the 2006 English and Welsh Civil and Social Justice Survey

Use of advisers – pages 55 -62
Attitudes to the justice system – pages 67-68

2007
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Consumer views and their experiences on using solicitor services and their awareness of the Solicitors Regulation AuthorityBaseline research report for the Solicitors Regulation AuthorityMay 2008

Reports on the findings of a survey of 1000 adults:

2008
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Consumer research study: a survey of public attitudes towards solicitors

Variance in demand for a diverse profession, factors of good service

2008
American Bar Association

eLawyering for a Competitive Advantage

Reports that Which?, found that:
- 29% of consumers reported that legal services were poor value for their money.
- 23% said that their solicitor did not listen to their opinion.
- 30% did not feel well informed about charges.
- 40% said that despite being unhappy with the service, there was no point in complaining because the Law Society would not do anything any way.
- 63% think it would be a good idea to get legal services at supermarkets or retail banking institutions. Page 3

Reports that they have done extensive research on what consumers want from lawyers:
- Information on what their case is going to cost;
- An idea of how long will their case take;
- Progress updates on their cases;
- Prompt response to letters and phone calls;
- Prompt responses to their complaint(s).
Which? also reports that consumers want legal advice and legal services to be delivered:
- Online; by phone; and even by text;
- Out of hours – not just the traditional 9:00 to 5:00;
- Linked to related services, such as the purchase of a home;
- Together with unbundled and DIY legal services.

Online consumers values include innovation, immediacy, and high customisation. Their behaviours include using the net as a an information source, use of comparison sites, try before you buy approach, and would rather use a web site prior to talking to someone. Page 8

2008
Ministry of Justice

Study of legal advice at local level

What clients want from their advisors (in order of priority) page 67.

2009
Byfield Consultancy

Big Bang Report: Opportunities and threats in the new legal services marketJon Robbins

Which identify success of legal services Act for consumers as brining greater transparency and improved access to justice – page 13
Positive impact of telling consumers cost of services upfront on reducing complaints – page 28

2010
Ministry of Justice

HM Courts Service Probate Service Survey 2009

Satisfaction with people they interact with, the facilities they use. and satisfaction with service offered? (Page 2)

2009
Youth Access

Rights to access: meeting young people’s needs for advice

Young people want their providers to be confidential, friendly, trustworthy, safe and non-judgemental. Soft skills are considered necessary

2002
Ministry of Justice

Access to justice: a review of the existing evidence of the experiences of minority groups based on ethnicity, identity and sexuality

Services fail to take into account ethno-cultural factors

2009
Legal Services Research Centre

Assessing the impact of advice for people with debt problems

Some respondents found it quite hard to get help from CAB due to restricted opening times (page 40). Tabular summary of what debt advice clients want (page 63).

2008
Citizens Advice

What clients and other groups say about advice services Simon Bottery Director of Communications

Quotes MORI poll in 2005 that found that:
What consumers want from advice:

2008