Organisation Description Year
Legal Services Research Centre

Transforming legal aid: Access to criminal defence services Dr Vicky Kemp

Identifies varied levels of knowledge of need for a solicitor in a police interview -
Those with a better understanding of the police investigative process, for instance, might decide not to have legal advice when they are being dealt with for minor offences or if they assume they will not be interviewed by the police. On the other hand, those with less understanding, such as those whose first language was not English, for example, were found to be less likely to have a solicitor – Page 35

2010
Advice Services Alliance

Towards a national strategy for public legal education

In one third of cases where people do not seek legal redress, it is suggested that the cause is that people do not know their legal rights or know how to get help (page 1-2). Suggests proactively providing legal education to help this (page 2). Wants national strategy to address the issue (page 5).

2004
ACCA

Intermediation of intellectual property awareness

Report discusses whether SMEs had sought advice on IP matters – a large number had (page 10)

2009
Cardiff University

The Advice Needs of Lone Parents Richard Moorhead, Mark Sefton and Gillian Douglas

Dependent on previous experience -
All of the advisers we spoke to in focus groups said that many lone parents were unable to identify and prioritise the most important aspects of problems. Whilst it was felt that some clients who had been lone parents for a long time could identify their own advice needs, a

2004
Legal Services Board

Understanding the economic rationale for legal services regulation

Differentiates between repeat / non repeat customers, in terms of how they understand the quality of what they are buying (page 27).

2010
Ministry of Justice

The market for “BTE” legal expenses insurance

Focus group found that consumers were aware (to some extent) of the existence of LEI (page 23 – 24) and whether they had it. Stats of awareness on page 37 – 38.

2007
National Consumer Council

Finding the will – a report on will-writing behaviour in England and Wales

Analysis of why the will was purchased

2007
Mayor of London

Into the Labyrinth: legal advice for asylum seekers in London

Asylum seekers have no real idea about how the system works; they are unlikely to understand the role of legal advice in the asylum process

2005
Legal Services Research Centre

Piecing it Together:Exploring One-Stop Shop Legal Service Delivery in Community Legal Advice Centres

Clients present their problems in different ways:
Clear and purposeful – awareness of the impacts of the problem, and specific. Taking client details sometimes got clients to express the kind of help they were seeking.
Unspecific – client not really sure why they are there and describing problem in vague terms.
Pages 93-94

2010
Ministry of Justice

Is the 2007 court fee remission system working?

Main focus of this report is discounts on court fees. But page 19 explains how clients are made aware of court fees regime – surveys which legal provider told them about the discount.

2009
Ministry of Justice

What’s cost got to do with it? The impact of changing court fees on users

Most people know about court use journey when they set out on it (page ii – iii) Discussion about whether court users know how much court fees will cost (page v). More on awareness of court process (pages 29 -31). More details on knowledge of court costs – page 38 – 44. And who tells them about court fees (page 46).

2007
Legal Services Board

The future of legal services: Emerging thinking

Pascoe Pleasance – LSRC & UCL – Reports that:
Action take depends on characterisation of a problem as legal – Overall, whereas respondents said they would seek help from a lawyer in relation to 44% of problems characterised as legal, the same was true of only 11% of problems not characterised as such.
For example, when problems concerning home ownership were not characterised as legal, just 11% of respondents suggested lawyers as a source of help. This rose to 55% when problems were characterised as legal.
The percentage of respondents who said they would seek help from the broader advice sector was similar, overall, whether problems were characterised as legal or not (28% and 25% respectively).
Page 41

2010
Ministry of Justice

Court experience of adults with mental health conditions, learning disabilities and limited mental capacity. Report 4: After court

Points out (page ii) that court users do not understand the terminology used in the court room. For example, understand judges’ summing up (page 5). Suggests post-court meeting to explain what has just happened (page 6).

2010
Legal Services Policy Institute

Towards a new regulatory structure for corporate and commercial legal services

Points out that some clients are sophisticated and others are not (page 5).

2009
Legal Services Research Centre

Report of the 2007 English and Welsh Civil and Social Justice Survey

Problem resolution strategies – pages 46 -52

2008
UCL

Why the courts are as important as hospitals to the nation’s health

Reports on limited levels if understanding of legal needs.

Legal services have both protective and restorative potential
They are both the barrier at the top of the cliff (information, advice, PLE)
And the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff (advice and representation

Reports on potential for legal services in a medical setting – Integration of lawyers in healthcare setting
Recognition that legal system often holds solutions to social determinants of health
income support for food
family violence
utility shut-off in winter
unhealthy housing conditions
homelessness

2009
Changing Ageing Partnership

Digital divide, older people and online legal advice

Issues only raised when an older person hears or reads something in the media. Older people may not be aware that the problem they are facing is legal

2009
Legal Services Research Centre

Report of the 2006 English and Welsh Civil and Social Justice Survey

Problem resolution strategies – pages 49 -54

2007
Youth Access

Rights to access: meeting young people’s needs for advice

22% of 13-19 year olds did not know where to go to get help. 38% of young people knew their legal rights

2002
Law & Justice Foudation of New Sourth Wales

Taking justice into custody: the legal needs of prisoners

Lack of awareness of how to get advice

2008
Law Centres Federation

The socio-economic value of Law Centres

Law Centres aim to increase public legal education

2008
Legal Services Board

Legal Advice for Small Businesses Qualitative Research

Legal needs for small businesses seen as exceptional – legal associated with terms like expensive, serious, last resort – slide 19
Very useful grid of legal needs – slide 20
How judged a legal need – slide 21

Motivations to seek legal advice and barriers – slides 35-36

2010
Lord Chancellor's department

The effectiveness of representations at tribunals Hazel Genn & Yvette Genn

Likelihood of success rates with representation (as opposed to no representation) summarised on page 243.

1989
Law & Justice Foudation of New Sourth Wales

Taking Justice into custody: prisoners legal need and access to justice – Draft – paper to the 8th LSRC conferenceSuzie Forell

Research indicates a low level of civil legal problem recognition amongst prisoners – pages 5/6

2010
Solicitors Regulation Authority

Consumer research study: a survey of public attitudes towards solicitors

Comparison between those from high SEG and those from low SEG knowledge of complaints procedures

2008
Legal Services Research Centre

Criminal defence services: users’ perspective

Survey of police station attendees: most new what was happening to them (page 2). Knowledge tended to increase the further their way through the process. Breaks down understanding by EM status (page 2 -3). More detailed breakdown pages 12 – 13.

2008
Legal Services Research Centre

Causes of Action: Civil Law and Social JusticeThe Final Report of the First LSRC Survey of Justiciable Problems

Responses to problems – pages 49-90

2004
Legal Services Board

Improving access to justice

Survey of small businesses suggested many did not even recognise that they faced legal challenges – and if they did, tried to avoid seeking formal legal advice to address them.

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Causes of Action: Civil Law and Social JusticeThe Final Report of the First LSRC Survey of Justiciable Problems – Revised 2nd Edition

Responses to problems, including characteristics of those who take action and those who , advice and seriousness, barriers to advice, and sources of advice – Pages 79 – 113
For those in temporary accommodation – pages 127 – 129

2006
Legal Services Research Centre

Horses for Courses – The law, legal services and the public

Survey outlines percentages of people who regarded legal problems as been a “legal issue” (varies hugely) page 8. Subsequent graphs seem to indicate whether it is “appropriate” to get legal advice for these issues (page 9 and 10).

2010
Ministry of Justice

Research into enforcement of employment tribunal awards in England and Wales

Sample group who were bringing employment tribal cases. Levels of legal knowledge explained in tabular form (page 14)

2009
Legal Services Board

LSB Initial consumer research – Summary

Two-thirds of those sampled professed little or no knowledge about what lawyers do. Professed knowledge broadly increases with wealth and higher social grades. That said, even with those at the highest incomes (

2009
Legal Services Board

Legal Advice for Small Businesses Qualitative Research

Similar to individual consumers, often business do not recognise that they are facing legal problems – page ii

2010
Solicitors Journal

The future is bright

Wants legal information to be made more available online and on phone to increase legal knowledge among consumers (page 26).

2010
Plenet

Legal Capability Martin Jones

Suggest low level of knowledge and people actively avoid the law seeing it as something to fear.
The episodic nature of law-related problems is a key factor. Although law-related issues are commonplace they occur periodically, often around key life events that are separated in time. As a result most people, most of the time, feel they need to think about the law. Instead they wait until a problem occurs and then try to acquire the knowledge needed to deal with it. Page 8

The foundation level of capability is less about intricate knowledge of the law and more about basic and practical knowledge and skills that can help us all deal with the common problems of everyday life. Page 10

2010
Law & Justice Foudation of New Sourth Wales

Outreach legal services to people with complex needs: what works?

Would not know where to go if it were not for the outreach centres

2009
Solicitors Journal

Evolution not revolution

Suggests many people know they have legal expense insurance (page 42).

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Assessing the impact of advice for people with debt problems

Summarises awareness of debt problems within sample group (page 21) – at what point did they realise there was a problem/

2008
Advice Services Alliance

Advice Services and Legal Capability Martin Jones and Theresa Harris Advice Services Alliance

Summarises LSRC findings on legal knowledge, and role of public law education. Defines legal capability in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

2009
ACCA

SME intangible assets

Report discusses whether there’s a lack of knowledge about IP rights among SMEs (page 29)

2006
Legal Services Research Centre

Knowledge, capability and the experience of rights problems

Survey asked people with problems if they knew their legal rights (page 27). A lot didn’t. Demographic breakdown follows on subsequent pages.

2010
Legal Services Research Centre

Criminal Case Profiling Study: Final report 2001 Pascoe Pleasance Hannah Quirk

Reporting on clients in the Police Station:
despite the fact that free legal advice is available to all persons detained by the police, only a minority of detainees choose to take advantage of it.54 The number doing so is higher amongst those accused of more serious crimes which, as Crown Court cases, most of our sample were. Nevertheless, some suspects accused of very serious crimes, such as sexual assaults on children, chose not to be represented in the police station.

2001
Ministry of Justice

The Living Together Campaign – An investigation of its impact on legally aware cohabitants

Survey contrasted level of legal knowledge in relation to living together before and after they had read report on their rights (page 20). Knowledge increased after reading report.

2007